What is a Pronghorn?

Wildlife

What is a pronghorn, you ask?

That is a great question! Although the pronghorn is similar to deer or antelopes, they belong to a family all their own. They live across North America, spanning from southern Canada to Mexico, according to the National Wildlife Federation. They prefer to dwell in open fields, plains, grassy areas, and desert type environments. According to National Geographic, pronghorns are the second fastest mammal in the world only second to the cheetah. Clocking speeds of up to sixty miles per hour! Pronghorns are also known for having one of the longest land migration of any animal in the United States! Trekking in large herds about one-hundred and fifty miles one way between the Upper Green River Basin in Wyoming and Grand Teton National Park. Because of their speed, they are able to to easily outrun predators such as coyotes or bobcats, but also can run great distances at half of their maximum speed.

The Start of my Summer Internship at the Seacoast Science Center

Wildlife

The Seacoast Science Center (SSC) is a nature center located in Rye, New Hampshire. SSC’s mission focuses on ocean conservation and education. I have been exploring at SSC since I was a kid. It was there that my curiosity for wildlife began blooming. Whether I was a toddler who had my arm shoulder-deep in the touch-tank checking out snails, sea stars, and urchins, or as a 9 -year-old camper at their nature day camp, or as a teen at their “Music by the Sea” summer concert series, I spent a lot of my youth there.

I recently began an internship with SSC doing marketing, social media, and event planning. This has involved everything from taking photos for social media, to writing interesting blog posts, deciding the best place in the center for donation signs, and planning virtual events! I am getting experience working on a marketing team, advancing my writing skills, and crafting photographs that interest the public. Although I am working remotely due to the global COVID-19 pandemic, I am gaining experience in a field that I want to go into. Nothing is more important to me than conservation education through creative expressions like writing, videography, and photography. It is my hope to work as a wildlife journalist and photojournalist in the near future.

Just this past week, I got to go into the center and play with Raspberry, a 35-year-old box turtle that was brought to the center when it first opened after being found abandoned at a construction site. He has become the unofficial mascot of SSC and is well-loved by both children and adults who visit. I spent my afternoon filming a cute, bouncy video starring Razz (as the staff call him) on our reopening plan. What a tough job, right? (Kidding of course!)

Raspberry the box turtle at the Seacoast Science Center. Photo Credit: Lauren Bucciero

I also got to be one of the first people to see the new exhibit on coral reef restoration. I’ve seen many changes to this humble non-profit over the years, but this one is particularly exciting as they are expanding their animal collection. There was a very personable eel (I’m unsure of his species, I’ll have to ask) that came out of his hiding place and slunk next to the tank, moving with whoever was walking by.

Eel at the Seacoast Science Center Photo Credit: Lauren Bucciero

SSC will always hold a special place in my heart. I’m fortunate enough to be gaining experience at this beloved facility for the summer that will hopefully help to further my career as a serious wildlife writer and educator in the future. Thanks SSC, with a special shout out to my supervisors Nichole VP, Karen the marketing director, and Heidi the social media specialist.

To learn more about the Seacoast Science Center, check out their website here